How to Use the DISC Test In Hiring

Did you know that a key part of finding the right person is to use the DISC test in hiring?

We assume that everyone is the same and that anyone can fit into any role.  This isn’t true.  There are people who are naturally chatty and people who are quiet by nature.

Others are very dominant and want to run their own schedule while yet others like to be given a list of tasks to finish.

Much of this depends on their DISC Personalities profile.  If you haven’t written your DISC assessment, try ours for free.

Here’s how to use the DISC test in hiring:

  1. Ask the candidate to fill out the test
  2. Have them estimate how much of each personality type they have
  3. Pose questions that give clues to their personality type
  4. Put right personality types in right roles
  5. Understand the limits of what the DISC test tells you

Ask the candidate to fill out the test

The first step is to ask the candidate to fill out the DISC assessment.  You can use the link above to get it done for free.  They will also receive a booklet explaining their scores and what their personality blend means.

I don’t overplay the importance of DISC to the candidate.  I simply ask them to fill out an assessment that helps us understand some of their basic strengths and weaknesses.  I stress that you can’t pass or fail the assessment, and that there are no wrong answers.

Once they’ve completed the assessment, I ask them to forward the scores to me so I can have a look at them.

Have them estimate how much of each personality type they have

I never believe the results, especially during a job interview.  There are many reasons to answer incorrectly.  The candidate is nervous and may answer differently than they normally would.

Or, the candidate gears their responses to what they think you are looking for.

In any case, I use it as a springboard for a conversation, not as a ‘take-it-to-the-bank’ sure fire accurate record of their personality type.  I want to ask a lot more questions to find that out.

My first step is to very quickly describe each category, and ask them to estimate which is their strongest, which is their weakest, and which rank second and third.  Then I ask why.  I also ask them to give examples of how they see each personality type in themselves.

Usually people answer honestly.  But if they don’t that’s okay, because I know how to find out the truth.

Pose questions that give clues to their personality type

Here are some traits that I look for, and a question I ask to determine who is who when I use the DISC test in hiring:

Dominant:

  • Should be nonverbal and not too chatty
  • Isn’t bothered by conflict
  • Is very goal focused
  • Question: Tell me about your current goals?

Inspiring:

  • Very verbal
  • Uses gestures
  • Talks a lot about ideas and the future
  • Question: What excites you about your future?

Supportive:

  • Appears reserved and quiet
  • Doesn’t say that much
  • More timid than bold
  • Question: How do you feel when you know there’s going to be a conflict next day?

Conscientious

  • Should be orderly and detailed
  • Talks a lot about task
  • Voice doesn’t go up and down
  • Question: How do you structure your work day?

Asking these questions, and looking for clues tells you where a person is strong and weak, even if they haven’t written the DISC Personalities test.

Put right personality types in right roles

Using the DISC test in hiring means you’re going to get people in right roles immediately.

If the job requires a ton of accurate detail, choose a Conscientious person.  On the other hand, if detail isn’t important, but networking and being verbal are, find yourself an Inspiring candidate.

When you need someone to take charge, you’re looking for a Dominant.  And when you have a role that requires a person who gets along with others, can deal with routine and is loyal, a Supportive fits the bill.

When these are mixed up, chaos ensues.  Please ensure that your accountant has some Conscientious to them!

Understand the limits of what the DISC test tells you

Using the DISC test in hiring doesn’t tell you everything about the candidate.  Even though they have the right personality type, they still need the right skills and attitudes.

The DISC personalities test won’t tell you about:

  • A person’s intelligence
  • Their morality (or lack of it)
  • The environment that shaped them growing up
  • Their social groupings that affect their attitudes today
  • Their skill level
  • The attitude and values they choose in life

It’s only a part, but it’s a big part.

If you want to play center in the NBA, being seven feet tall is a must.  However, every seven footer isn’t an NBA player.  It’s just the first requirement to even think about filling the role.

In summary:

It’s important to use the DISC test in hiring because it will help you find a candidate who is cut of the right cloth.  While it doesn’t tell you everything you need to know, it’s a great first step to finding a winner and putting them in the right seat.

Here’s how to use the DISC test in hiring:

  1. Ask the candidate to fill out the assessment
  2. Have them estimate how much of each personality type they have
  3. Pose questions that give clues to their personality type
  4. Put right personality types in right roles
  5. Understand the limits of what the DISC test tells you

Man in Library

Trevor Throness is a speaker, consultant, and author of “The Power of People Skills.”  He is also co-founder and senior instructor at www.professionalleadershipinstitute.com https://www.professionalleadershipinstitute.com/

Find more about “The Power of People Skills” here: https://www.amazon.com/Power-People-Skills-Dramatically-Performance/dp/1632651068

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